BUSS DURKEE HOSTILITY INVENTORY QUESTIONNAIRE PDF

The Hostility Questionnaire Taking a written test is the first and easiest way to evaluate your hostility level. Your answers, taken all together, should provide a reasonably accurate profile of your attitudes and behaviors, if you take care to answer accurately. Try to get rid of your chaperone before you begin. Avoid the temptation to choose the response you think you ought to pick, or the one you think would sound right to other people. Answer as spontaneously as you can.

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The Hostility Questionnaire Taking a written test is the first and easiest way to evaluate your hostility level. Your answers, taken all together, should provide a reasonably accurate profile of your attitudes and behaviors, if you take care to answer accurately.

Try to get rid of your chaperone before you begin. Avoid the temptation to choose the response you think you ought to pick, or the one you think would sound right to other people.

Answer as spontaneously as you can. Otherwise, you will only be fooling yourself. Unlike the tests you took in school, there are no right or wrong answers here. What feels right to you is the correct answer. Each question describes a specific or general situation that you have probably encountered. After each description you are presented with two responses, A or B.

In some instances, neither response may seem to fit, or both may appear equally desirable. This is normal; go ahead and answer anyway, choosing as best you can the single response that is more likely for you in that situation. You may prefer to write down the numbers 1 through 46 on a blank sheet of paper, and then write an "A" or "B" beside each number, to indicate your choice for the corresponding question.

This way, others can take the test without being influenced by your responses. In addition, your responses can remain private. Remember, choose only one response for each situation described.

Take as much time as you need to make your choice for each item, but remember that what seems right at first glance—your "gut" reaction—usually represents your true position. On average it should take about fifteen minutes to answer all of the questions. A teenager drives by my yard with the car stereo blaring acid rock. I can feel my blood pressure starting to rise. The person who cuts my hair trims off more than I wanted. I tell him or her what a lousy job he or she did. I am in the express checkout line at the supermarket, where a sign reads: "No more than 10 items, please!

I pick up a magazine to pass the time. I glance ahead to see if anyone has more than ten items. Many large cities have a visible number of homeless people. I believe that the homeless are down and out because they lack ambition. The homeless are victims of illness or some other misfortune.

There have been times when I was very angry with someone. I was always able to stop short of hitting them. I have, on occasion, hit or shoved them. The newspaper contains a prominent news story about drug- related crime. I wish we could put every drug pusher away for good. The prevalence of AIDS has reached epidemic proportions.

This is largely the result of irresponsible behavior on the part of a small proportion of the population. AIDS is a major tragedy. I sometimes argue with a friend or relative. I find profanity an effective tool. I hardly ever use profanity. I am stuck in a traffic jam. I usually am not particularly upset. I quickly start to feel irritated and annoyed. There is a really important job to be done.

I prefer to do it myself. I am apt to call on my friends or co-workers to help. Sometimes I keep my angry feelings to myself.

Doing so can often prevent me from making a mountain out of a molehill. Doing so is usually a bad idea. Another driver butts ahead of me in traffic. I usually flash my lights or honk my horn. I stay farther back behind such a driver. Someone treats me unfairly. I usually forget it rather quickly. I am apt to keep thinking about it for hours. The cars ahead of me on an unfamiliar road start to slow and stop as they approach a curve.

I assume that there is a construction site ahead. I assume someone ahead had a fender bender. Someone expresses an ignorant belief. I try to correct him or her. I am likely to let it pass. I am caught in a slow-moving bank or supermarket line. I usually start to fume at people who dawdle ahead of me. I seldom notice the wait. Someone is being rude or annoying. I am apt to avoid him or her in the future. I might have to get rough with him or her. An election year rolls around.

I learn anew that politicians are not to be trusted. I am caught up in the excitement of pulling for my candidate. An elevator stops too long on a floor above where I am waiting A.

I soon start to feel irritated and annoyed. I start planning the rest of my day. I try to end the encounter as soon as possible. I find it hard not to be rude to him or her. I see a very overweight person walking down the street. I wonder why this person has such little self-control. I think that he or she might have a metabolic defect or a psychological problem. I am riding as a passenger in the front seat of a car.

I take the opportunity to enjoy the scenery. I try to stay alert for obstacles ahead. Someone criticizes something I have done. I feel annoyed. I try to decide whether the criticism is justified.

I am involved in an argument. I concentrate hard so that I can get my point across. I can feel my heart pounding, and I breathe harder. A friend or co-worker disagrees with me. I try to explain my position more clearly. I am apt to get into an argument with him or her. Someone is speaking very slowly during a conversation. I am apt to finish his or her sentences. I am apt to listen until he or she finishes. I have strong beliefs about rearing children. I try to reward mine when they behave well.

I make sure that they know what the rules are. I hear news of another terrorist attack. I feel like lashing out. I wonder how people can be so cruel. I am talking with my spouse, boyfriend, or girlfriend.

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Buss Perry Aggression Questionnaire

Faum Join this workspace To join this workspace, request access. Widely used to evaluate people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, the ABAS-3 assesses adaptive behaviour in individuals from birth to 89 years of age. There was a problem providing the content you requested Williams 1 Estimated H-index: Personality characteristics of high and low aggressive adolescents in residential treatment. Pages Images and files. Show 0 new item s.

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Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire

Retest reliability for the BPAQ over nine weeks is also satisfactory correlations ranged from. To our knowledge, no one has examined the relative utility of an alternative three-factor model i. Construct Validity Construct validity for the Buss-Perry subscales is supported, to some extent, by their relative associations with other self-report measures of personality traits. In an additional study reported by Buss and Perry , there were significant correlations reported between BPAQ scores and peer nominations relevant to each subscale, with the strongest correlations reported for the Physical Aggression scale presumably the dimension most salient and observable by peers. Gallo and Smith reported evidence for the discriminant validity of the Buss- Durkee subscales using the Five Factor model and the Interpersonal Circumplex, showing that Anger and Hostility were associated somewhat more strongly with Neuroticism than the Physical Aggression and Verbal Aggression subscales, that Physical Aggression and Anger were more strongly associated with Conscientiousness negatively than the other two subscales, and that Verbal Aggression was associated with a more dominant interpersonal style, whereas Hostility was associated with a more submissive manner of responding.

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